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Tuesday, October 23, 2018
HomeVinylBand InterviewsInterview: Jethro Tait on his Debut Single

Interview: Jethro Tait on his Debut Single

Jethro Tait on his Debut Single:

Jethro Tait has been hiding in the shadows for years but has finally come out into the light with his debut single: One for the Books. Naturally, I hit him up and talk past, present, and future with the not so newbie on the scene.

Richard Chemaly (RC): Right so, I’m no Instagram expert but it seems you’ve got it down to an art. The theme going on there has a solid grey/blue vibe. How do you achieve this?

Jethro Tait (JT): I wouldn’t really call myself an expert either but I think it helps to get a sense of continuity or a theme going on your timeline. I use an app called “Enlight” and use a black and white filter. The app has an option to “wipe” areas of the back and white and restore it to colour. I use that to keep myself in colour and change the background to black and white.

In the Instagram editing section I pull down the saturation and warmth and add a bit of blue on the colour section. It’s a bit of a process but it looks quite cool when you’re done.

RC: We’ve been playing Running Wild on my radio show a stack. What’s it mean to you to be able to associate with other artists?

Photo Credit: Oxana Nacu

JT: Thank you so much! It’s always great to be able to associate with other artists, especially the ones who have been in the business for longer than you have. You always learn a lot and they give you a sense of what to work towards. I loved working with Pascal & Pearce on this track. They’re such great guys and I couldn’t have picked a better act to have worked with on my first solo endeavour.

RC: You’ve done a stack of work for other artists. There’re quite a few people in that position, hiding in the shadows. What did it take to be tell yourself you’re going to go out and make it on your own? What advice could you give others in that position?

JT: I always wanted to be an artist so it wasn’t really a decision I had trouble making. I got into behind the scenes work because those opportunities came before the opportunity to be an artist came. I only really became known as a songwriter after working with Craig Lucas on his album for songs like “Smother.”

Photo Credit: Oxana Nacu

The advice I would give is that you just need to be confident in your work. It’s really hard sometimes, but doubt really is your worst enemy. It takes a lot of hard work but if it’s what you really want then you have to go for it.

RC: The new single is proper difficult to place. It’s a great song but I have no idea what to do with it, which is weird for me. What are your intentions for the song. Sure you want people to listen to it and enjoy but few people do that in isolation anymore. Is it a get high and listen to my song song? Is it a I want a filmmaker to discover this song song? Is it a there’s no other song for you to walk on stage to but this song song? What kinda song is it?

JT: That’s weird, I never really thought of it as a difficult song to place. I wrote it as a pop song with dance influence and we played around with some darker undertones in the production.

It’s a song that you can listen to in isolation and delve a little deeper into its meaning or you can just dance to it and enjoy the feel without taking too much note on what I’m talking about lyrically.

RC: Is this song foreshadowing something bigger later this year? A tour, an album perhaps?

JT: I am currently in studio working on a body of work. I have a lot of songs already written we’re just choosing the strongest ones and getting the production done. It will either be an EP or an album depending on how many songs we’re happy with. I’m hoping to release before the end of the year.

Photo Credit: Oxana Nacu

Written by

Born and bred in Bloemfontein on a diet of cynicism, brandy and terrible literature, this little boy, disguised as a sane adult, takes comfort in knowing that the world is wrong and is set on proving it. Did we mention he's an attorney with a degree in economics? Rich quit his job, jumped on a train, currently pays rent to hold his stuff in Hillbrow and is actually the most non-attorney attorney around. He's a law firm specializing in Entertainment and Entrepreneurship. He's also moved on to Jack Daniels. You can tweet him @uncle_chem to find out about his un(self)employment adventures.