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Saturday, October 20, 2018
HomeFuture SightTechnology NewsWe use Facebook, but we don’t really like it.

We use Facebook, but we don’t really like it.

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Thought’s on being on Facebook

Isaw a pretty interesting video on my Facebook feed yesterday morning. It was about how: Millennials Don’t Exist, a talk by Adam Conover, one of the crazy people behind College Humour and Adam Ruins Everything.

Although not a typical marketing professional (what is a typical marketing professional?) Conover discusses how marketing communications target these generations and box people in categories based on what they believe are their common traits.

Millennials for example are known to be lazy, arrogant and full of over-confidence and are mostly self centred, or un-caring, also technologically savvy, creative and problem solving. Or at least, that’s the widely held belief of people that are older than the segment of people considered to be Millennials, essentially people born between 1985 and 1990, apparently.

Being a Millennial myself, I have heard similar jabs by my elders, my parents or grand parents discussing “my future” and if when Ill stop fooling around and start making money and so on, I’m sure marriage and children come in there somewhere too.

We can discuss and argue the validity generational demographics for hours.

But,

What I do want to discuss, and what I want you as an curious reader to think about is a phrase Conover used, which for some reason birthed an obvious truth that everyone knows, but know one thinks about:

“…They use Facebook, but they don’t really like it…”

Isn’t that the truth.

When last has someone said to you: Oh my word, don’t you just love Facebook, or, Wow, Facebook is really awesome now!

We hear it about Instagram all the time though, or about Snapchat, but I’ve hardly heard anyone say that they have a similar affinity for Facebook.

We all use the thing! But do we really care about it. Is the resource that is Facebook less valuable than it was in high school?

Instagram’s resource makes sense: pretty pictures, we love them, it stimulates us. Even Snapchat: entertaining pictures/videos, it entertains us.

But when it comes to Facebook, besides being able to connect with my one thousand friends that I’ve accumulated over the past decade (which I totally do on a daily basis, not), in a personal capacity, I have very little need to be there any more.

Yes, like everything, Facebook has massive virtues, like bringing people together, sharing memories and joy, success and achievements and provide support to like minded individuals. There is a whole bunch of articles onwhat happens to your brain when it’s not on Facebook too.

Of course, I need to be there for Facebook advertising to promote mybrand and company to the other five billion people that are on the platform.

But, would it matter to not be on it.

As a person or even a brand.

We are on Facebook, but do we value it? Why do we stay?

I think this also may be a question of equity. What have you invested into Facebook as a platform? Years of memories and pictures and conversations, nights out, relationships and connections and competitions.

Maybe we feel we need to be there, because, our whole lives are there. It’s not like you can just give all that up, it would be a real waste right?

Inow work closely with my old friend Devon.

One day, Dev and I we’re looking through some interesting video work he had produced over the past few years that we hand’t worked together, until he asked me how my girlfriend was doing. He didn’t know that we had broken up.

Oh, no, we’re not together anymore Dev, it’s been a few months now”, I said to him.

Wow dude, sorry, I didn’t see anything”, replied Dev.

We then changed subject to what he just said: Not seeing anything. As he mentioned, it’s a weird world we live in, that he didn’t “see” anything about my personal break-up.

The reality is that our lives are not only our lives, they’re everyone else’s too.

Like a soap opera or a roman gladiatorial game. It’s our addiction. It’s a part of our social DNA.

We don’t like it, but we cannot pull ourselves away.

We don’t like it, but we’re on it.

I’m not trying to bash Facebook or the personal use of it, I’m merely suggesting that maybe we’re getting to a point on our social media evolution that we need something more stimulating than being stuck scrolling our news feeds.

What do you think? Leave a comment below: 

Originally Published by Brett Magill on Medium.


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